Sadia Khan: a Human Rights Blogger Whose Life is still in Danger

Sadia Khan is a Pakistani human rights blogger who has been living in hiding for a long time. Too long.

Fearing for her life due to her investigative work, Sadia, along with her 10-year-old sister Amala and their mother, fled to Sri Lanka in January 2012, after the ISI, Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence, allegedly tried to kill her.

When Sadia left Pakistan, she hoped she could find a better life in the neighboring country Sri Lanka.

However, this did not happen.

I first wrote about Sadia and her sad story in May 2014, hoping that the Sri Lankan government could grant her and her family refugee status and therefore special protection in the country.

Since we last spoke, the Sri Lankan government expelled hundreds of asylum seekers from the country and Sadia is being neglected  basic human rights.

This is what she told me:

“We are going through a horror. Sri Lankan Governement has ordered the deportation of all asylum seekers, they say whoever doesn’t have Sri Lankan visa would be deported.

Our resettlement case is stuck in Canadian embassy.

They want me to go through a medical check-up which includes an identification process and it is very risky for me to be identified by the Sri Lankan authorities.

The Canadian embassy has taken out loads of refugees from Sri Lanka ignoring my extremely dangerous situation.

We remain in hiding more scared then we were before.

I requested the Canadian embassy to allow me to go on with my medical examination without being identified by the Sri lankan staff. I asked them if they can send some embassy staff with me to the hospital, so I can do my medical examination with an anonymous name. I also told them that I am ready to pay all my bills myself but they refused.

Now my life is in extreme danger: Sri Lankan police is looking everywhere for Pakistanis. In this situation we can be very easily caught and deported the next day.

I wrote against the Caliphate: a common goal for Islamic terrorists and now my own life is in extreme danger; I am wanted not only by Pakistan but by all those who want the Caliphate. I am being followed on internet by members of ISIS.

Please write about my help-less situation once more and also please write to Canadian embassy or some other embassies in Sri Lanka to save my life.

Please also ask some of your friends to support us by writing to the embassies or in some other way.”

You can contact the Sri Lankan government and the High Commission of Canada Colombo to enquiry about the asylum seekers situation in the country.

Let’s spread Sadia’s story, let’s help her obtain the recognition she deserves.

 

Ferguson Shooting: What has Changed for Black Americans Since 1964 Race Riots?

micheal brown 2

Article originally written for IBTimes UK 

Fifty years ago several cities in the US witnessed an uprising by the black community in protest at police brutality and social inequalities.

New York, Rochester and north Philadelphia were just some of the places rocked by violent clashes between black people and the police in the summer of 1964.

Now, fifty years on from the riots – and 51 years after Martin Luther King’s memorable I have a Dream speech, aimed at promoting black people’s rights – tensions have once again escalated between police and the black community.

This time the protests centred on 18-year-old African-American Michael Brown, shot dead by a white policeman in Ferguson, Missouri, on 9 August.

An audio recording examined by the FBI alleged that officer Darren Wilson fired 11 shots. Brown, who was unarmed, was hit by six bullets, two of which penetrated his skull.

Police brutality in the US

Brown’s shooting sparked international outrage, with many calling for greater efforts to eliminate racial inequality, black poverty and police brutality against African-Americans in the US.

The teenager’s death is just the latest of a list of homicides and beatings of black civilians by police in the States.

In 2009, unarmed 22-year-old Oscar Grant was shot dead in California by a police officer who claimed he mistook his gun for his taser. The officer was charged with involuntary manslaughter and sentenced to two years in prison.

In the same year, 43-year-old Eric Garner, suspected of illegally selling cigarettes in Staten Island, suffocated after a police officer put him in a chokehold. In footage of the incident, Garner, who was asthmatic, repeatedly said to the officer “I can’t breathe”. He died shortly afterwards.

According to professor and author Marc Lamont Hill, a black civilian in the US is shot by a police officer every 28 hours.

A 2013 study from the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, which promotes African-Americans’ rights, found that at least 313 black people were killed by police officers, security guards and self-appointed vigilantes in 2012.

Police brutality not the only example of race inequality 

Brown’s homicide is the latest event to bring to the surface the issue of racial inequality in the US. In the debate, some have tried to justify police brutality due to the high crime rate present in black communities.

However, police brutality is not the only example of race inequality.

According to recent reports, black people are six times more likely to be incarcerated in the US.

Texas death row inmate Ray Jasper highlighted the problem of racism against black people in his last letter before execution, saying that places still remain in the US where “a black person would not be welcomed.”

Others have argued that in the same cities where black minorities rallied in 1964, black poverty, segregation and violence against African-Americans are still prevalent.

As long as police brutality against black people is only partly condemned, or justified as a consequence of alleged crime rates, the crisis may never be addressed and more may lose their lives.

 

Witch Hunting in India Targets Hundreds of Vulnerable Women Every Year

 

Witch-hunting in India  mainly targets women who, believed to be daayans, or witches, are persecuted, tortured and killed.

Witch-hunting in India mainly targets women who, believed to be daayans, or witches, are persecuted, tortured and killed.

In an era where dozens of people say we no longer need feminism, women are subjected to brutal discrimination in many rural areas in India, where witchcraft is used as an excuse to persecute hundreds of vulnerable women and girls.

I invite all those people who deny the need of feminism in modern times, to read this article..which is just one example of the thousands of injustices women are still subjected to worldwide.

 

 

 

 

 

Article originally written for IBTimes UK

An Indian woman has been beaten to death after she was accused of allegedly practising witchcraft.

Saraswati Devi, 45, was assaulted by other villagers of East Champaran, Bihar state, on Saturday.

The woman ‒ who was also forced to eat “human excreta” according to police records ‒ was rushed to the nearest hospital where she was declared dead.

Her two sons also sustained injuries while trying to save their mother.

Devi’s brutal homicide is only the latest in a series of witch-hunting cases in India, which mainly targets women who, believed to be daayans, or witches, are persecuted, tortured and killed.

Originally practiced by few tribes, witch hunting is on the rise in rural India, where at least 12 states have recently recorded cases of women being persecuted and killed for allegedly practising witchcraft.

The state where witch hunting is mostly practised is Jharkhand, where 54 women accused of witchcraft were killed last year.

In October 2013, a woman from the Shivni village fell ill. As villagers suspected the illness was due to witchcraft, a local shaman ordered that all the female villagers had to drink poison in a “witchcraft test.”

Of the 30 women forced to drink the poison, 25 died.

At least 2,100 people have been murdered for “practising witchcraft” in India between 2000 and 2012, according to the Indian National Crime Records Bureau data.

Reasons behind witch hunting

There are several reasons, such as gender inequality and property disputes, behind the labelling of Indian women as witches.

Womensenews.org said  that branding a woman as a witch is “a common ploy to grab land, settle scores or even to punish her for turning down sexual advances.

“It is difficult for the accused woman to reach out for help and she is forced to either abandon her home and family, commit suicide or is brutally murdered.”

Kanchan Mathur, a professor at the Institute of Development Studies said, “Poor, low-caste women are easy targets for naming/branding [as a witch]…Women who are widowed, infertile, possess ‘ugly’ features or are old, unprotected, poor or socially ostracised are easy targets.”

Howeveraccording to Women New Network (WNN) – which reports about women’s issues –women who become too powerful and thus threaten the male leadership can also become the target of witch hunting.

WNN added that the Hindu religion has several rituals that can be misinterpreted as witchcraft.

Ineffective laws

As there is no specific law in India to protect people from witch hunting, the rate of conviction in cases of crime against alleged daayans is low (26.9 %).

A study published in the Journal of the North East India Studies explained that witch hunting cases are currently registered under sections: murder, grievous hurt, assault, assault or criminal force to woman with intent to outrage her modesty, kidnapping for ransom and criminal intimidation.

Only three states in India – Bihar, Jharkhand and Chhattisgarh – have enacted special laws about witch hunting.

However, these laws are thought to be inefficient due the surge in witch hunting crimes.

According to Rahul Mehta of Jharkhand’s Chotanagpur Sanskritik Sangh, which promotes rights of people in the Chotanagpur Plateau, eastern India, one of the causes of the inefficacy is that sometimes entire villages are involved in witch hunting crimes.

“When an instigator mobilises a whole community, collecting evidence or getting witnesses becomes a problem. The police needs to be trained to handle such situations.”

As women are also blamed of witchcraft following the death of villagers, the improvement of health care centres could result in a reduction of which hunting crimes.

According to the Mahila Samakhya Society, witch hunting cases are significantly fewer in areas with a good government network of primary healthcare centres.

“Typically, an ‘ojha’ or a village quack doctor diagnoses an illness as the curse of a ‘witch’, which results in a humiliating and violative hunt thereafter,” it said.

“If doctors are made available in rural areas, incidents of witch hunting can come down.”

Iran has a Long Way to Freedom

 

TEHRAN, IRAN - JUNE 04:  A woman holds a portrait of the Ayatollah Khomeini outside Khomeini's shrine on the 25th anniversary of his death on June 4, 2014 on the outskirts of Tehran, Iran.   Getty Images.

TEHRAN, IRAN – JUNE 04: A woman holds a portrait of the Ayatollah Khomeini outside Khomeini’s shrine on the 25th anniversary of his death on June 4, 2014 on the outskirts of Tehran, Iran. Getty Images.

Article originally shared on IBTimes UK

 

Few days ago Iran marked the 25th anniversary of the death of Ayatollah Khomeini, the political and religious leader who created the Islamic Republic of Iran and pursued a mass campaign of persecution against his opponents.

More than two decades after the death of the controversial leader, who sparked international outcry for his repressive methods, little progress has been made in promoting human rights in Iran.

The second-largest nation in the Middle East often makes headlines worldwide for its repression of freedoms and crackdown on dissidents.

Only last month, Iranian actress Leila Hatami risked public flogging for kissing the president of the 67th Cannes Film Festival on the cheek.

A few days afterwards, six young Iranians – three men and three women – were jailed for participating in singer Pharell’s new video Happy We are from Tehran.

The youths were depicted singing and dancing and the three women did not have their heads covered, a compulsory requirement under Islamic law in the country.

Tehran police detained them as they “hurt public chastity”. They were later released on bail at around $100,000 (£59,726) each.

Shortly afterwards, British tourist Roya Nobakh was sentenced to 20 years in jail after she posted a Facebook message criticising Khomeini.

An Iranian court has also ordered the blocking of the photo-sharing app Instagram because of privacy concerns. The recent ban adds to the list of other social media, such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, inaccessible in the Republic.

The country has also been stormed by the My Stealthy Freedom revolution, launched by women who are protesting against the forced use of the hijab, a veil that covers head and chest.

A long way to Freedom

More than 20 years after Khomeini declared dissidents to be enemies of the state, repressed any form of public debate and issued a fatwa – an order to kill – against the writer Salman Rushdie for his novel Satanic Verses, Iran still has a long way to reach true freedom of expression and the recognition of other basic rights.

Iran is witnessing an increase in protests, led particularly by women. However, more has to be done in order to obtain the guarantee of basic freedoms.

Not only should Hasan Rouani’s government stop repressing those who voice their dissent, but it must also allow Iranians to freely participate to the political life of the country.

In order to obtain concrete achievements, the Iranian government should implement legislation that protects basic human rights and allow radical changes in the leadership to take place through democratic elections.

And this, as we know, might take a long time and several revolutions to happen.

 

See also: Iranian Women Launch Facebook Page Against Hijab: ‘A Key Challenge to Regime’ Activist Says 

 

Andijan Massacre: The Mass Killing Uzbekistan Government Refuses to Acknowledge

 

Picture taken 12 July 2005 shows an Uzbe

An Uzbek refugee crying in a refugee camp in the Kyrgyz village of Sassyk Bulak. On the parched hills of southern Kyrgyzstan,

Article originally written for IBTimes UK 

Nine years on from the Andijan massacre which cost the lives of a reported 1,000 people at the hands of the Uzbek government, IBTimes UK looks back at this tragic event – its causes and its aftermath.

The uprising erupted in the eastern Uzbek city of Andijan on 13 May 2005, following the prosecution of 23 Uzbek businessmen allegedly tied to religious group Akramiya.

The prosecution, deemend unjust by many, sparked protests which culminated in the storm of the prison where the businessmen were being held.

Some gunmen, joined by the 23 freed defendants, took over the regional administration building in Andijan, and took at least 20 law enforcement and government officials hostage. Hundreds of civilians joined the gunmen’s protest demanding the resignation of President Islam Karimov.

After hours of fruitless negotiations, the government launched a major offensive on the square where the protesters had gathered to voice their dissent. Hundreds of unarmed people were killed.

Journalist Galima Bukharbaeva, who was present when the government troops opened fire, said: “At first, one group of armoured-personnel carriers approached the [city] square, and then another group appeared.

“They opened fire without mercy on everyone indiscriminately, including women and children. The crowd began to run in all directions. We dove into a ditch and lay there for a while. I saw at least five bloody corpses next to me.

“When we got out of the ditch, we ran along the streets into the neighbourhood and looked for a place where there was no shooting. But shots could be heard everywhere…”

Another witness told the BBC: ”We don’t know what happened to us. All of a sudden these heavy armoured vehicles came, we don’t know how it all happened, we are simple citizens, ordinary people.”

The estimates of those killed range from 187, the official count of the government, to 1,500.

Mass Graves

Several bodies were buried in mass graves holding 15 to 20 people each, or thrown into the Karasu River.

According to Muhammad Solih, founder and leader of Uzbekistan’s Erk political party, at least 18 flights took 35 or more bodies out of Andijan shortly after the massacre.

Some families of the deceased found the graves of their relatives, dug up the bodies, and reburied them.

What does the Uzbek government say about the massacre?

The government justified its actions by saying it was trying to quell a violent protest by Islamist extremists.

Nine years after the massacre the government is still refusing to take responsibility for the hundreds of innocent people who died.

In light of this refusal to admit responsibility, Human Rights Watch has urged the US and the EU to press Uzbekistan to open an independent and international inquiry.

“The long shadow of Andijan and the crackdown the government unleashed in its wake still hang over Uzbekistan’s people and their government’s relations with the world,” said Steve Swerdlow, central Asia researcher at Human Rights Watch.

“The issue of Andijan is not ‘closed’ for the victims’ families, those the government continues to unlawfully imprison, or the countless other citizens who live in fear of peacefully expressing opinions that differ from the Uzbek government line.”

Help Sadia Khan: Young Activist who Cuts Herself in Protest as Pakistan Wants to Kill Her

Please share this story. I spoke personally with this woman who is tremendously courageous. She is forced to live in hiding because the Pakistani government wants her dead. She lives with her 12-year-old sister in Sri Lanka, where the government has confiscated their documents. They are trapped. They need everybody’s help. There is a petition to sign, you can find it here. PLEASE READ AND SHARE. THIS IS URGENT. WE MUST DO SOMETHING FOR THIS FAMILY.

sadia-khan

Sadia Khan and her mother at an undisclosed location in Sri Lanka – Youtube

“People think that in Pakistan crimes are committed only by the Taliban,” the young activist Sadia Khan told me. 

Khan, 29, comes from a Christian Pashtun family in Baluchistan, Pakistan.

She has always been interested in human rights and, at a very early age, she started writing about abuses occurring in her country – carried out by fundamentalists and members of the government – with the hope that her words could pave the way to social justice.

Her blog, however, was soon noticed by the ISI (Inter-Services Intelligence in Pakistan), who she claims tried to quell her voice.

“I was writing a book about the Pakistani ISI.

“There was an army operation going on in the country: The army would kill those who were against Taliban.

“Somebody started following me, as soon as they knew I was writing the book.”

Fearing for her life due to her investigative work, Khan, along with her 10-year-old sister Amala and their mother, say they fled to Sri Lanka in January 2012.

Khan kept publishing blog posts under the fake name of Khizra Khan Yousafzai.

The three women applied with the UN High Commissioner for Refugees UNHCR to be recognised as asylum seekers in Sri Lanka, but their request was rejected.

Khan was accused of being a spy for India by the Sri Lankan government, who confiscated the three women’s documents and took them to a detention camp, where they stayed for one month.

During the detention, Khan suffered a minor heart attack.

The three women fled the detention centre on 8 April 2013.

Khan started contacting journalists, asking them to write about her situation.

Sadia (right) and her sister Amala

Sadia (right) and her sister Amala

The Colombo Gazzette and the Cristian Post were the only publications that reported her story.

The Sri Lankan UNHCR eventually approved Khan and her family’s asylum requests in November 2013, thanks to newly arrived senior RSD officer (Refugee Status Determination) Ilija Todorovic. Later, another “very helpful” resettlement officer Joseph Carroll joined UNHCR Colombo.

If those two guys were not here, I would be dead,” Khan said. “They are the decision makers, but none from the other staff helped me. UNHCR local staff is working for their own government.

“For one long year they refused to talk to me. They literally ruined my life.”

Khan says the Sri Lankan government is still in possession of the three women’s passports, stopping them from leaving the country.

“Sri lanka is playing games, they are not holding any meeting with them [Todorovic and Carroll], they are holding our passports because they want to take me to the detention centre,” Khan said.

Carroll confirmed to me that Khan’s family has been granted refugee status in Sri Lanka.


Living as refugees

“We now live separate from our mother,” Khan said.

amala-khan

Amala, Sadia’s sister, celebrating as UNHCR grants them refugee status in Sri Lanka – Sadia Khan’s blog

The two sisters keep moving from house to house as soon as the landlords ask for their documents.

“We come up with an excuse that we are going to my aunt, for example, and we leave.

“We live in fear. When we go out, I wear a burqa with a fully covered face and my sister is disguised as a boy.”

The two sisters have written about their precarious situation on blogs and social media. They also have aGoogle+ page and a YouTube channel and a petition on change.org

In one video posted on YouTube, Khan is shown cutting herself in protest at her situation. Although her face is visible, she does not fear she will be recognised.

“Even at home I show very little part of my face, there is no way someone can recognise me from the video.”

After more than two years living in hiding, and constantly fearing for her life, Khan’s anger towards the Sri Lankan government is growing. But she is very determined to have her rights recognised.

“Please write my story,” she said. This will bring shame to the Sri Lanka government and will help me to leave this country, that’s all I want.”

 

 

Be Inspired – A Little Reminder of How Powerful WE Can Be When We Fight For OUR Freedom

 

Photo

 

There is something painfully beautiful when human beings defeat any fear and stand up for their rights. They suddenly become immortal heroes whose deeds will be eternally echoing throughout history.
It’s impossible to ignore people’s courage, their endless hope to fight for a better future, their inner certainty that even the harshest regimes will eventually capitulate; because when people become tired, frustrated and angry, no dictatorship will be able to quell their voices.

Ludovica Iaccino 

Extract from : Frontline Club Preview Screening of ‘The Square’, iecoAfrica 

 

Uganda Homophobia and Warlord Joseph Kony: Truth Behind Mainstream Media

Articles written for IBTimesUK 

Yoweri Museveni’s Homophobic Bill: What’s Behind Ugandan Homophobia?

Uganda has undoubtedly attracted lots of international attention lately all thanks to President Yoweri Museveni’s crackdown on homosexuals.

In fact NigeriaCameroon and Arizona have all distinguished themselves with overtly homophobic  legislation.

Behind the signing of Uganda’s controversial anti-gay bill lurks political subterfuge and vanity.

Museveni originally rejected the controversial bill, which sees life imprisonment for homosexual offences, saying that there were other ways to “cure” homosexuals, and life imprisonment was not the right one.

But about a month later Museveni had consulted a team of “experts” who declared homosexuality “not genetic” but a “social behaviour”. Satisfied with proof that sexual orientation was dependent on moral choices made by individuals, Museveni signed the bill amid local applause and international outrage.

After 28 years of uninterrupted power, Museveni knows he is ripe for replacement by another political leader at the next election.

It seems likely Museveni has come under pressure from a range of political imperatives, and has buckled in order to preserve his power. Definitely among them would be influential parliamentary speaker Rebecca Kadaga, a staunch supporter of the country’s anti-gay bill. In return for signing the bill Kadaga could well have pledged her support to the president in the run-up to the next elections.

Kadaga has often expressed her will to turn the controversial bill into law, leading human rights activists to protest.

According to independent journalist and reporter Fulvio Beltrami, who writes for Italian newspapers Indro and Reteluna.it, important oil reserves were found in the northern area of Uganda in 2004.

The drilling operations are assigned to three companies: British Tullow, French Total and Chinese Cnooc.

Once extracted, the oil will be refined in Uganda and then sold in local and regional markets, with a small percentage destined to the European and Chinese markets, Beltrami said.

US president Barack Obama said that if Uganda passed its homophobic bill this would complicate relations with the US.

Museveni, probably allured by the opportunity to hold on to power at whatever cost, has ignored the US. But he can afford to these days thanks to Africa’s newest and biggest investor: China.

Museveni’s rapid change of heart might have something to do with plans to start oil production in Uganda in 2016/2017. This will have raised political stakes in the country enormously, while also granting Uganda a degree of impunity on the global stage.

 

Related

 

Why is America Obsessed with Ugandan Warlord Joseph Kony?

 

The US has recently re-launched a campaign to capture Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony, as Obama vowed to send 150 additional Special Operations troops and four military aircrafts to Uganda, to help capture the warlord.

After a video about Koni’s almost 30-year-long regime of terror, under which girls were sexually enslaved, while child soldiers were forced to join rebel group Lord Resistance Army, was released by Invisible Children in 2012, Kony’s activities attracted Obama’s administration’s attention.

Two years later, media have been flooded again with a renewed anti-Kony campaign, which,  however, might be put down to economic reasons, rather than the necessity to stop crimes against humanity.

According to independent journalist and reporter Fulvio Beltrami, who writes for Italian newspapers Indro and Reteluna.it, since Kony escaped North Uganda in 2005, he no longer poses a threat to the country.

“On many occasions, Uganda People’s Defence Force (UPDF) and American marines have spotted and attacked LRA campuses where Kony lived; however, the attacks were always preceded by news leaks that allowed Kony to escape,” Beltrami told IBTimesUK.

“The aim was to keep the ‘Kony myth’ alive, to justify UPDF and US Army’s presence in key zones such as: South Sudan, North Kivu, Congo and the western area of Central African Republic (CAR). Surprisingly enough, all zones rich in mineral and oil,” he continued.

According to Beltrami, Kony has been trying to end a guerrilla war which no longer benefits him, in exchange for a blanket pardon for war crimes.

“Peace negotiations, however, were sabotaged by the Ugandan government, as the end of LRA means the end of Washington- Kampala military activities in the region,” Beltrani explained.

The last attempt at capturing Kony was made in October 2011, when Ugandan soldiers, joined by CAR and US forces, found Kony having a bath in a river.
Instead of capturing him, the Ugandan soldiers received the order to withdraw, allowing Kony to escape.

In November 2013, Kony said he was willing to surrender, during peace negotiations with the then CAR president Michael Djotodia.

“Uganda authorities, after diplomatic clichés, did not do anything to get in touch with Kony,” Beltrami said. “Yoweri Museveni [Uganda's current president] has managed to build the most powerful army in the region, thanks to the ‘Kony myth’”.

 

 

 

 

What if Oscar Pistorius were black?

 

Article written for IBTimesUK 

 

Former Olympic runner Oscar Pistorius is on trial accused of murdering his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, though he claims he mistook her for an intruder and shot her by accident.

Pistorius’s defensive claim relies heavily on the stereotype of the respectable middle class white man’s fear of a black intruder who will steal, rape and kill. The learned response is to bear arms with extreme prejudice – and this was the cause of his girlfriend’s death.

Imagine for a moment if Pistorius were black, however. Would he still be eligible for the benefit of doubt In a country where Apartheid is still echoing in many Afrikaners’ lives and racial equality is still something of a utopian dream state?

According to journalist Margie Orford: ”The figure of the threatening black stranger has driven many South Africans into fortress-like housing estates, surrounded by electric fences, armed guards and the relentless surveillance of security cameras.

“This figure is the reason almost every middle-class home has a panic button on both sides of the double bed in the master bedroom, a red button that will summons armed guards to the house within minutes.”

Filmmaker and writer Gillian Schutte described South Africa as a “world in which to be black and male makes you vulnerable to random shootings in suburban settings, where it seems, any black male is a potential threat.”

Is Pistorius, then, leveraging on a widespread fear of swart gevaar (Afrikaans for black threat) to make his crime more excusable?

In recent years, many fear that revenge attacks against white South Africans could be carried out. A black man who intrudes in a white man’s mansion becomes, therefore, the perfect scapegoat.

In South Africa, even after 20 years the end of racial segregation, white people live in rich farms while hundreds of black families are still in hovels, and 59% of South Africans believe that integration is impossible.

In a place still governed by racist stereotypes and institutionalised  inequality; where corrupt police can carry out mass-murder, as in the case of Marikana, or stage public tortures, as in the case of Mido Marcia who died after being dragged by a police car, what sort of justice can be expected.

What are the chances of a white multi-millionaire Olympic runner – once considered a hero – to be jailed over the “accidental” shooting of his girlfriend?

If you want to know more: 

Sharia Law Betrays the Koran

Sharia law allows extremist believers, terrorist groups and judges to build up reigns of terror in which people (in particular women) are tortured, mutilated, stoned to death and executed in the name of Allah who, however, has never demanded such massacres, labelled with the pretest of religion. 

Sharia expert Hasan Mahmud has been fighting for years against the application of sharia as legislation in a state; Mahmud has been always open to dialogue with Muslims who strongly believe in the sharia as the only possible solution to run societies.

 

No one has yet responded to Mahmud’s invitation. 

Article written for IBTimesUK

Sharia, also known as Islami Qaqun, is the moral code and religious law of a prophetic religion, and represents Islam’s legal system.

Contrary to what many believe, sharia does not come from the Koran or the Prophet’s examples (Hadises), as there are at least 11 sources of the law.

“That the sharia derives from the Koran is a myth,” the general secretary of Muslims Facing Tomorrow, Hasan Mahmud, told IBTimesUK.

“There are about 13 laws in the Koran and few dozen which come directly from the Prophet; there are more than 6,000 laws in each of Hanafi and Shafi’i books of sharia, most of which are man-made,” he explained.

“Many sharia laws violate the Koran, especially when it comes to women’s rights. In court the judges do not open the Koran, they open the sharia law book and they apply it,” Mahmud said.

In Sharia – Undoing the Wrongdoing, Mahmud wrote: “It would stun to know that the Koran mentions the word “sharia” only once as noun and only twice as verb.

“Sharia literarily means the path made by animals going to the spot of flowing water or flowing water itself,” he continued. “Symbolically, it means path to salvation or Nirvana. This is exactly what the Koran used the word for: ethical guidance or a moral code that leads to peace and paradise. Transforming ‘moral guidance’ to ‘state law’ was the very first betrayal the Koran suffered.”

According to Mahmud, who wants to warn Muslims worldwide against the dangers of Sharia and its inapplicability in modern states, sharia law will eventually fail as it does not have the capacity to run in modern states.

“Sharia law is not only about laws and contents, it is about the spirit of it, which is to dominate the whole world,” explained Mahmud, who is also a producer of three films on the subject. One, The Divine Stone, is a short drama on sharia dedicated to Aisha Ibrahim Duhulow, a 13-year-old Somali girl stoned to death by al-Shabab militants after she was raped by three armed men.

“Many Muslims believe that sharia is God’s law and should be applied to correct the decay of moral values,” said Mahmud.

“It is true that since WW2 the world has been witnessing a decay in moral values, but what sharia does is more devastating – by applying sharia, Muslims are helping a devil in disguise.”

Mahmud was born in Bangladesh in 1949, lived in the Middle East for several years, and in 1990 moved to Canada, where he became the director of Sharia Law for the Muslim Canadian Congress. He has fought against allowing sharia courts in the country.

“God’s law has been established in Islam, but there is a very small peaceful group who interprets Islam in a peaceful way. But we have started only lately,” Mahmud explained.

“God’s law has been established in Islam, but there is a very small peaceful group who interprets Islam in a peaceful way”
Hasan Mahmud

“Radical Islamists have been trying to establish sharia in the West, the very first sharia law court supported by local law was established in Toronto in 1991; we came to know about in 2003, then we secular Muslims, started a huge movement against it and ultimately we succeeded in 2005 September: that court was abolished by the government,” he continued.

Mahmud, who is also on the advisory board of theWorld Muslim Congress and a research associate at Deen Research Center in the Netherlands, has received a death threat for his stancer.

“I have not been able to go home for 15 years. [Radical Islamists] declared that I am an atheist and I am part of anti-Islamic conspiracy. They are looking for my blood,” he said.

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